Namibia:Women’s Science Camp Concludes – Girls Inspired to Take Up Careers in Science, Tech Fields

The Women in Science (WiSci) STEAM camp ended on a high point last week when Intel Corporation sent 100 ecstatic high school girls home with their own tablet to help them on their road to becoming future scientists, engineers, artists, and mathematicians.
U.S. Ambassador to Namibia, Lisa Johnson, during the closing ceremony at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) said the camp was just a beginning.
“As you return home, I encourage you to keep the spirit of WiSci going. Be an ambassador for all that WiSci stands for: intellectual curiosity, cross-cultural understanding, and support for young women interested in STEAM fields,” she added.
NUST played host to the two week long camp from 17-29 June where about 30 representatives from Google, Intel, and NASA engaged with girls from Ethiopia, Kenya, Swaziland (eSwatini), the United States, and Namibia.
Namibia was represented by 36 girls from 11 different regions. The aim of the camp was to encourage girls to take up ca..

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Tanzania:Udom Plans Introducing Biomedical Science Studies

By Ludovick KazokaDodoma — THE University of Dodoma (UDOM) is planning to introduce a course in biomedical sciences at its College of Health Sciences in order to close the gap of biomedical scientists in the country.
UDOM Vice-Chancellor, Prof Egid Mubofu made the revelation here on Wednesday, pointing out that the programme would provide the country with experts in diagnostics clinical laboratories and biotechnology among other areas of the field.
“This will provide the country with medical and non-medical laboratory technicians for maintenance of laboratory facilities,” said the UDOM Vice-Chancellor (VC) in an interview with the 'Daily News' on his first 100 days in office.
Dr Mubofu noted that plans were underway for UDOM to team up with a Japan-based Nishimura Medical Instrument Company Limited to offer capacity building to its teaching staff members in Biomedical Sciences.
“The company has demonstrated its willingness to offer training to UDOM teaching staff and an o..

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Africa:Bloodless Malaria Test Wins Africa’s Engineering Prize

By Gilbert NakweyaNairobi — An innovative device that tests for malaria without the need for drawing blood and a laboratory technician has won a 24-year-old Ugandan software engineer the Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation.
The non-invasive innovation dubbed Matibabu, which means medical centre in Swahili, is a low-cost, reusable device that clips onto a patient's finger, and can show results within one minute on a mobile phone that is linked to it.
Brian Gitta and his colleagues received the first prize worth £25,000 (almost US$33,000) in an event held in Kenya this month (13 June), and attended by over 100 delegates from academic institutions, governments, and non-governmental organisations. At the event, four finalists from Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda pitched their innovations to judges with the audience given a chance to vote.
Gitta said that his team has signed an agreement with the Ugandan government for clinical trials to enable them establish the device&..

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South Africa:4-Million-Year-Old Skull Is Similar to Ours

For 23 years the intricacies of a 4-million-year-old cranium fossil discovered in the Jacovec Cavern in the Sterkfontein Caves remained a mystery to researchers.
But thanks to high-resolution imaging technology, researchers at Wits University have discovered that the skull belonging to the extinct genus Australopithecus is remarkably similar to the human skull.
“Our study revealed that the cranium of the Jacovec specimen and of the Australopithecus specimens from Sterkfontein, in general, was thick and essentially composed of spongy bone,” researcher Dr Amelie Beaudet said.
“This large portion of spongy bone, also found in our own cranium, may indicate that blood flow in the brain of Australopithecus may have been comparable to ours, and/or that the braincase had an important role in the protection of the evolving brain.”
This means that the thick protection provided by the skull may have allowed for the human brain to evolve into what it is now.
The high-resolution scanning techn..

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Africa:No One-Size-Fits-All Solution for Climate Adaptation in Africa

Photo: Jeroen van Loon/Deutsche Welle
Maalim and other Kenyans believe Camels will provide them food security in the future. interview By Melissa BritzCape Town — Adaptation Futures 2018 – one of the largest gatherings of climate scientists, practitioners and business leaders has taken place for the first time on the African continent with the goal of highlighting challenges faced by the global south in dealing with climate impacts. allAfrica caught up with the International Development Research Centre's Georgina Cunhill Kemp to hear her thoughts.
What you are working on at the moment?
I'm a senior programme officer in the climate change programme which falls within our agriculture and environment programme and I specifically work on the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA).
This is a seven-year partnership programme between the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and the Department for International Development in the UK D..

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Tunisia:Tunisia, UK Establish Permanent Committee to Support Scientific Co-Operation

Tunis/Tunisia — Tunisia and the United Kingdom, on Thursday, decided to set up a permanent committee to support scientific co-operation between the two countries, following a meeting in Tunis attended by Higher Education Minister Salim Khalbous and British Minister of State for the Middle East and North Africa Alistair Burt.
The Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research said the setting up of the 30-member committee aims to enhance co-operation between Tunisia and the United Kingdom in the field of higher education and scientific research.
He added that the committee will explore all available co-operation opportunities and focus on channels of continuous communication between universities in Tunisia and their British counterparts in order to benefit from their experience in research and higher education.
In a statement to TAP, the minister said the establishment of the committee will help strengthen the position of English language teaching in Tunisian universities, stre..

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East Africa:Comesa Region Lags Behind in Robotics, Artificial Intelligence

By James KaruhangaCountries in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) are lagging behind with respect to robotics, artificial intelligence and technology infrastructure and skills acquisition.
Jean Baptiste Mutabazi, the regional bloc's Director of Infrastructure, noted this during the COMESA Connect Industry Dialogue in Kigali themed “Smart Technologies for Sustainable Businesses.”
Held in Kigali, the meeting was organised by the COMESA Business Council and Rwanda's Private Sector Federation of Rwanda (PSF).
While Egypt, Seychelles, Kenya and Mauritius lead in terms of internet penetration and mobile density and in trade in ICT services, Mutabazi said, the rest of the region largely lags behind in a number of ways, particularly with respect to robotics, artificial intelligence and technology infrastructure and skills acquisition.
COMESA member states are; Burundi, the Comoros, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya..

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Namibia:Scientists to Study Namib Desert Beetle

Photo: Jochen Bihn/ Flickr
The Namib Desert is best known for its high species richness of beetles, particularly those belonging to the family Tenebrionidae (Lovegrove 1993). Many of these have evolved methods of condensing fog as a source of water. ENTOMOLOGISTS from the North Arizona University have embarked on an N$11 million study of the darkling beetle to advance scientific understanding of these insects found in the Namib Desert of southern Africa.
With funding from the National Science Foundation, NAU entomologist Aaron Smith will embark on a major study that seeks to advance scientific understanding of these remarkable insects, including their phylogeny, evolutionary history and global biodiversity patterns.
More than 20 000 different species have been identified, but thousands more are still awaiting discovery.
“This project will resolve centuries-old issues in our understanding of desert darkling beetles,” he said.
Smith added that the darkling beetles are an incredibly ..

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Africa:Cassava Breeding Could Impair Yield By 20%

By Paul AdepojuIbadan — Breeding African cassava cultivars for improvements such as pest and disease resistance could impair their yield potential, a study suggests.
According to UN Food and Agriculture Organization, cassava is a major staple food for over one billion people in 105 countries. In Sub-Saharan Africa and other tropical and subtropical regions, cassava is the third largest source of calories.
In a study published in the May issue of the journal Food and Energy Security, US-based researchers assessed the rates at which the cassava cultivars transform light energy and carbon dioxide into yield, a process known as photosynthesis.
Stephen P. Long, a co-author and a professor at the Departments of Plant Biology and Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the United States, says that the process of photosynthesis in most crops is inefficient but bottlenecks can now be identified and addressed by modifying gene expression.
“What we are doing with photosyn..

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Nigeria:Nasrda Predicts Appearance of Moon Tomorrow

The Centre for Basic Space Science of the National Space Research and Development Agency (CBSS-NASRDA) has predicted that the Astronomical Lunar Crescent would be sighted tomorrow.
The agency's Director, Media and Corporate Communications, Dr. Felix Ale, said this in a statement yesterday in Abuja.He said: “The conjunction of the moon would first occur on June 13 by 8:43p.m, but will appear in Nigeria tomorrow around 2:43p.m, which is 18 hours after its conjunction.”
According to him, the moon could only be sighted with the naked eyes when there is a clear sky without any obstruction.He, however, added that the tiny lunar crescent could be sighted with the aid of Charged Couple Device (CCD) and astronomical telescope, or any other advanced astronomical instrument.
“Yola will be the first to witness the young lunar crescent around 6:53p.m to 7:21p.m, followed by Maiduguri from 6:55 p.m. to 7:23 p.m.”Kebbi will witness the lunar crescent last by 7:32 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., while Sok..

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